Monday, September 1, 2014

cutiefifty6:

hoodbypussy:

:)))

I just made the weirdest sound did that just come out of my mouth

Sunday, August 31, 2014

5centsapound:

Dmitry Gomberg: Akrak Vazha (The Shepherd’s Way)

Artist Statement: 

This is a story about Tusheti - mountain region in the Republic of Georgia. Tusheti lies near the Chechen border and it is culturally closer to Chechens than to Georgians. The story is about shepherds who travel every summer to their ancestors’ land Tusheti and than return to spend the winter at the bottom of the mountain. Twice a yaer they travel with their sheep through the pass in the Caucasus which is 3,000 meters high. 

I was staying and documenting life of the Shepherds in the Caucasus mountains for 5 years.

These people have been cheese makers since before Christ.

Their life is simple and harsh, but beautiful.

(Source: zrinkacvitesic)

houghtonlib:

Guillemeau, Jacque, approximately 1530-1613. Tables anatomiques, avec les pourtraicts et declaration d’iceulx, 1586.
Typ 515.86.440
Houghton Library, Harvard University

houghtonlib:

Guillemeau, Jacque, approximately 1530-1613. Tables anatomiques, avec les pourtraicts et declaration d’iceulx, 1586.

Typ 515.86.440

Houghton Library, Harvard University


The Himba wear little clothing, but the women are famous for covering themselves with otjize, a mixture of butter fat and ochre. The mixture gives their skins a reddish tinge. This symbolizes earth’s rich red color and the blood that symbolizes life, and is consistent with the Himba ideal of beauty.

The Himba wear little clothing, but the women are famous for covering themselves with otjize, a mixture of butter fat and ochre. The mixture gives their skins a reddish tinge. This symbolizes earth’s rich red color and the blood that symbolizes life, and is consistent with the Himba ideal of beauty.

(Source: itaibachar)

bobbythewhale:

relateable cartoons.

bobbythewhale:

relateable cartoons.

(Source: forlackofabettercomic)

Saturday, August 30, 2014
I remember reading this book on mythology—like, the mythropes in writing—and it blew my mind that all of that mythology is basically men writing about men and great myths for men, of which there are so many. And then there are only a handful of myths about women and they’re also written by men, so you start to realize that so much of storytelling has been lost in male perspective and you’re either Persephone—innocent, naive, and kidnapped by Hades into the underworld and has to be rescued; or you’re like Athena—unapproachable, vicious and there’s no gradient. And for me, it’s an amazing thing to begin to think about what it means to tell feminine mythology because it needs to be invented, it doesn’t exist; and also, what does inherently feminine storytelling and structure look like? Brit Marling for Violet Magazine
Interview here starting pg. 202 (via pambeesly)

(Source: versavis)